Derek Irvine

The VP of Client Strategy and Consulting at Globoforce (www.globoforce.com), Derek Irvine is one of the world’s foremost experts on employee recognition and engagement, helping business leaders set a higher vision and ambition for their organizations. As a renowned speaker and co-author of Winning with a Culture of Recognition, he teaches companies how to use recognition to proactively manage company culture. Contact him at irvine@globoforce.com.

Articles by Derek Irvine

Talent Management

Open Offices? They May Actually Be Damaging Employee Productivity

Illustration ny istockphoto.com

Compensation and benefits covers a lot of ground. Can we consider it to also, well, literally cover ground?

I’m asking this after a recent dinner with close friends.

Jane works for a very large, multi-national high technology company. She’s been with this company more than two decades as a very highly educated and skilled engineering professional. During that time, she’s changed desk locations, offices, even states (having moved between coasts of the United States).

But it’s her latest move that’s causing her the most problems. Read more…

Rewards & Recognition, Talent Management

Improving Engagement: Sometimes, It Just Takes a Little More Recognition

123RF Stock Photo

Last week, I shared information showing that increasing employee engagement is one of the best ways you can help secure corporate information. Today, I’m following up with how to increase employee engagement based on the latest from Aon Hewitt.

Last week Aon Hewitt released its annual Best Employers in Canada list. Overall, Canadian employees are more engaged (65 percent engaged) than their U.S. and global counterparts (61 percent for both). Best employers in Canada averaged 77 percent employee engagement (versus 58 percent for other employers).

This is lovely news for Canadian employers, but what does it mean? What mechanism does Aon Hewitt use to determine employee engagement? Read more…

HR Management, Talent Management

How Great Engagement Can Improve Your Information Security

Computer Security

What’s on the list of “top concerns” for your organization?

I’m willing to wager that security makes the list, and it’s likely it is near the top.

Driving recently, I heard a news story about the switch in thinking in tech companies in recent years. Just a few years ago, the idea of hiring “white hat hackers” to find bugs and security weaknesses was verboten. Now, this type of employee is in high demand. Read more…

Classic TLNT

Two Lessons We Should Have Learned in Management 101

© HP_Photo - Fotolia.com

Editor’s Note: Readers frequently ask about past TLNT articles. That’s why we republish a Classic TLNT post every Friday.

An interesting book that was quite popular in America in the late 1980s was All I Really Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten.

The book was a collection of musings, including the title piece, which gave referenced key life lessons such as: “play fair,” “don’t hit people,” and “clean up your own mess.”

I often think we forget these major life lessons we learned when we were young when we enter the world of business. And that is unfortunate, indeed. What would be the Management 101 equivalent? Read more…

Culture, Talent Management

The Art of Perseverance: Why “True Grit” Is Key to Successful Workforce

True Grit

When you hear words like “grit,” “determination” and “self-control,” what emotion does that conjure up in you? I’d be willing to guess that emotion wouldn’t be “positivity.”

And yet, the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania is where MacArthur Foundation “genius” award winner Angela Lee Duckworth leads the research into how just those attributes of “grit” translate into greater success than talent or IQ. Read more…

Classic TLNT

3 Keys to Being a Good Boss – It’s About Presence, Praise & Promise

best-boss

Editor’s Note: Readers frequently ask about past TLNT articles. That’s why we republish a Classic TLNT post every Friday.

Today’s post is inspired by this one on small gestures made by good bosses, especially those at the most senior level.

It’s also inspired by a sneak-peek I got at the results of our latest Workforce Mood Tracker survey, which showed employees would rather have a better boss than more money in their paycheck.

That caused me to think about the characteristics of a better boss. While there are many, these three seem to rise to the top continually: Read more…

Culture

Want a Culture of Appreciation at Work? It All Starts with You

Photo by istockphoto.com

Tell me about your workplace environment. What’s the general attitude or “feel” of the office?

Hopeful and energetic? Downtrodden and despondent? Somewhere in between?

What’s your personal reaction to this environment? How do you work within it or contribute to improving it? Do you see this as your responsibility? Read more…

Talent Management

It Takes a Workforce “Posse” to Help Make the Stars Shine

posse

I’ve found yet another good executive interview featured in the New York Times Corner Office column.

This one is with Deborah Bial, president of the Posse Foundation, which “recruits and trains students from public high schools to form teams to help them succeed in college.”

This is quite an interesting organization with a purpose I’m happy to support and publicize. But there’s value for us in the workplace, too. In this brief interview about her approach to helping at-risk teens succeed in college, Bial offers three lessons any of us can apply in our organizations, today. Read more…

Rewards & Recognition

The Power of Peers, or Why You Need to Better Leverage Friends on the Job

Facebookfriend11

Do you have friends at work? What about a best friend?

Do you think this is too “soft” a question to be asking about the workplace environment?

Having friends at work matters – for many reasons:

  1. It increases employee engagement. Gallup asks just 12 questions to gauge employee engagement and one is “I have a best friend at work.” Read more…
Culture, Leadership

3 Things Real Leaders Do to Shape Company Culture

123RF Stock Photo

Among my list of favorite authors, thinkers and change agents is Steve Kerr. His book Reward Systems: Does Yours Measure Up? is one I often recommend for its common sense approach to recognition and reward.

As the former Chief Learning Officer and head of leadership development for both GE and Goldman Sachs, Steve Kerr is also well-known for his seminal article On the Folly of Rewarding A While Expecting B.

He’s continued to educate along that theme, using the recent quality and safety challenges at GM as an example. In a Harvard Business Review blog post, Steve concludes with asking why it is so out-of-the-norm and courageous to behave in ways that demonstrate the behaviors the company has said it desires (namely: product quality, safety, transparency and integrity). Read more…