Derek Irvine

The VP of Client Strategy and Consulting at Globoforce (www.globoforce.com), Derek Irvine is one of the world’s foremost experts on employee recognition and engagement, helping business leaders set a higher vision and ambition for their organizations. As a renowned speaker and co-author of Winning with a Culture of Recognition, he teaches companies how to use recognition to proactively manage company culture. Contact him at irvine@globoforce.com.

Articles by Derek Irvine

HR News & Trends, Talent Management

The Market Basket Shutdown: It Taught Us What Matters to Workers Most

marketbasket

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the unfolding saga of the Market Basket grocery store walkout.

For those not in the know, non-unionized employees walked off the job or protested outside of stores in support of their beloved CEO, Arthur T. Demoulas (called ATD). Market Basket is a family-owned business of several dozen grocery stores across New England. But the family that owns it was fairly evenly divided between those in ATD’s camp and those on cousin’s Arthur S. Demoulas side.

Arthur S. owned 51 percent of the chain and, I think it’s fair to say, had an acrimonious relationship with his cousin, ATD, who owned the remainder. ATD served as CEO until mid-June, when he was fired by the board, led by cousin, Arthur S. That prompted the employee walk-out, demanding the return of ATD. Read more…

Rewards & Recognition

3 Reasons to Empower All Employees to Give Discretionary Rewards

123RF Stock Photo

Ann Bares (editor of Compensation Café and contributor to TLNT), published a very good post here yesterday on discretionary rewards.

The article focused primarily on the unintended consequences of leaving these discretionary reward budgets solely in the hands of the manager – to which I say, “Hear, hear!”

Ann used a couple of illustrations to highlight the challenges of such programs, which boil down to: Read more…

Talent Management

Getting Better Results: Go Beyond High Potentials, Look at ALL Employees

give-way-high-potential

Personnel Today recently reported on a survey conducted by KPMG’s Global HR Centre of Excellence.

The survey asked “people and change practitioners” from across KPMG’s global member network about the new “war for talent” and how it manifests in today’s workplace.

Even as the slow economic recovery continues to drag on, we are experiencing a war for talent — even as the skills needed and talent sought is itself evolving. And the needs of who and how we target employees for training, growth and advancement needs to also change. Read more…

HR Management, Talent Management

Why Your Employees Need to be Both Engaged AND Aligned

© Yuri Arcurs - Fotolia.com

I appreciate a good analogy, especially when it comes to terms that can be defined in multiple ways.

Employee engagement and alignment are a good example. Here’s a brilliant analogy from a local business journal:

Employee engagement is essential to an organization’s success, and alignment is arguably even more important. As an example, consider a 400-meter relay race. The winning team carries the baton past the finish line first. The direction of the finish line represents alignment between employees and the organization’s vision and goals. The speed of each runner is akin to engagement. To win, every runner in the team must run fast (i.e. be engaged with the organization) but also run in the direction of the next runner or the finish line (i.e. be aligned).” Read more…

HR Management, Talent Management

Timely Feedback Always Matters – Especially When It’s For the Good

feedback

Seth Godin is one of my favorite “short form” bloggers.

Generally, his posts offer pithy insight and advice in short, easily digested posts. Here’s a nugget from a recent such post:

The best way to change long-term behavior is with short-term feedback. The opposite is not true. We rarely change short-term behavior with long-term feedback… If you want to reward (or punish) short-term behavior, don’t do it down the road.” Read more…

Culture

How You REALLY Achieve a Powerful Company Culture

Photo by istockphoto.com

Company culture is important. I think we can all agree on that.

But what is culture? And who determines it? I’d argue it isn’t what management or the executive suite suggest it is. No, company culture is what employees experience and feel every day.

In that spirit, today I point you to China Gorman’s Data Point Tuesday blog post It’s All about Trust: Honesty and Transparency.  Read more…

Culture, Talent Management

Hiring For Core Values Is a Good Start, But There’s More to It Than That

123RF Stock Photo

This won’t be surprising to regular readers of this blog, but I am a firm believer in the importance of hiring people who personally reflect your organization’s core values.

Why? Because it makes it that much easier to embed your values into the way they work every day.

Of course, I’m not unique in my thinking. I’m sure many of you agree with the approach. Read more…

Culture, Talent Management

Finding Change Agents: It’s the Critical Part of Change Management

© JiSIGN - Fotolia.com

Change. It’s inevitable. Chances are you’re in the middle of a change initiative of some kind in your organization at this very moment.

What’s your attitude towards change? Excitement? Concern? Avoidance? Trepidation?

All of those are valuable and I can guarantee all are felt to one degree or another by every person in your organization.

But change is necessary. We cannot always remain as we are and continue to grow, develop and mature. Read more…

HR Insights

What’s Your Word for “Happiness at Work?”

123RF Stock Photo

If I asked you to describe your attitude towards your work in one word, what would it be?

Setting aside for a moment your feelings for work, the English language admittedly makes this difficult.

German, for example, is a fascinating language in that new or changing concepts can be described by stringing words together to create a new one (e.g., freundschaftsbezeigungenwhich means “demonstrations of friendship”). Read more…

Compensation, Talent Management

Stacked Ranking: A Pay For Performance Model You Need to Avoid

Performance Great Best

Ann Bares recently wrote a predictive article here on TLNT about the potential end of merit pay (How Will We Pay With Open Salaries and No Performance Reviews?).

In her post, Ann argues that because “open salaries” and “blowing up performance appraisals” are becoming more popular, merit pay cannot be long for the world. She ends by asking:

What will we do instead? Strictly market-based wages with “hot skill” premiums as appropriate? More emphasis on variable pay plans designed to reward specific, pre-determined individual or group metrics? Will recognition and non-cash rewards step into the void to provide the necessary differentiation for key talent?” Read more…