Benefits

Compensation, Talent Management

When It Comes to Employee Wages, We Just Need to Do the Right Thing

Do the right thing

This pay initiative is an important part of our strategies to continue attracting and retaining the best talent in order to deliver a great shopping experience, remain competitive on wages in our U.S. markets and stay focused on our value mission,” TJX Chief Executive Carol Meyrowitz said in a statement.

Having noticed from afar the recent groundbreaking announcements that have come from major retailers in the U.S., that decision has given me cause for hope.

First Wal-Mart and now Target has, on their own initiative, decided to raise the wages of their workers. That is a good sign. I particularly liked the above statement, tying it to “attracting and retaining.” Read more…

Compensation, Legal Issues

FLSA Changes Could Make Many Retail Managers Non-Exempt Employees

flsa

By John E. Thompson

Expectations are that the U.S. Labor Department’s proposed regulations re-defining the federal Fair Labor Standards Act‘s executive, administrative, professional, outside-sales, and derivative exemptions will be released in the next few weeks, if not within days.

As we have said, these provisions will probably include:

  • A substantial increase in the minimum salary amount; and,
  • A significant narrowing of the duties-related requirements. Read more…
Compensation, HR News & Trends

New Comp Survey Finds – Surprise! – That Workers Might Want a Better Deal

Payscale

Last week, compensation solutions expert PayScale released its annual 2015 Compensation Best Practices Report.

PayScale titled its report Attack of the Out-of-Date Comp Plan (cute, huh?), because they believe:

  1. Compensation data gathered in real time (versus “aged” data) is needed to make the best compensation decisions; and,
  2. No company can afford to not understand that, lest said company find itself a victim of its own out-of-date business practices. (At least that’s what I think they believe.) Read more…
Compensation, HR News & Trends

How One Winning Actress Fueled the Oscars’ Equal Pay Moment

www.starpulse.com

In case you haven’t been on the Internet in the last 36 hours, Patricia Arquette is being celebrated for more than just her Oscar win for Best Supporting Actress in Boyhood.

During Sunday night’s live Academy Awards telecast, the seasoned performer stood up for women everywhere, making a rousing plea to take action about the notorious gender pay gap.

The problem of pay disparity between men and women in Hollywood was already in the public eye thanks to the high-profile cyber-attack against Sony last December. Read more…

Compensation, Legal Issues

More Erroneous Nonsense on Tipped Wages, Courtesy of the Labor Dept.

minimum wage

By John E. Thompson

A recent post appearing on the U.S. Department of Labor’s blog begins, “The federal tipped minimum wage has been $2.13/hour since 1991. That’s right – it’s been the same for nearly a quarter century.

Actually, that’s wrong.

As we explained previously, there is no such thing as a purportedly lower “tipped minimum wage.” The federal Fair Labor Standards Act’s minimum wage for tipped employees is precisely the same as for all other non-exempt, non-tipped workers: $7.25 an hour at present. Read more…

Benefits, Legal Issues

Can Employers Mandate Vaccinations During a Disease Outbreak?

measles

By Paul Starkman

Recently, vaccinations and public health have dominated the national conversation.

Much of the focus is on the more than 141 confirmed cases of measles in the United States. Measles has been confirmed in 19 states and Washington D.C., including 107 cases in California.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, measles is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Measles can be serious, even deadly, especially for children younger than 5-years-old and those with weakened immune systems such as people battling cancer. Read more…

Compensation, Talent Management

Low-Balling a Candidate: Worth a Pat on the Back, or a Boot in the Butt?

© John Takai - Fotolia

Picture the scene: Your company is seeking to employ a Department Manager, and the leading candidate is currently “in transition.”

Human Resources has pegged the market value of the job at $75,000, but you suspect that the preferred candidate (Bob) will accept $65,000.

A seasoned and experienced professional, Bob was previously paid $77,000 by his last employer, but was caught up in a restructuring staff reduction. He’s been out of work for almost a year and is getting desperate, worried about feeding his family and paying the mortgage.

When the decision point arrives other, less qualified candidates are already making $70,000 and are asking for $75,000 and up. Some hiring managers would look at this situation as a no-brainer. “Let’s hire Bob and save $10,000 to $15,000” would be the smug decision. Read more…

Benefits, HR News & Trends

Weekly Wrap: There’s Power in Perks, But Not All Companies Get That

Perks

As someone who worked in the San Francisco Bay Area during the dotcom boom, take it from me — employees LOVE perks.

Silicon Valley figured out a long time ago that all the things companies do for employees above and beyond a paycheck can be both a great lure for new talent, but also a great way to retain those you already have in the fold.

Of course, most companies in America don’t offer the kind of perks that Silicon Valley tech firms do, but as some recent research found, that doesn’t mean that those additional benefits above what you pay people aren’t a great tool for attracting (and keeping) top talent. Read more…

Benefits, HR News & Trends

Senate Committee Told EEOC Must Provide Guidance on Wellness Plans

workplacewellness

Editor’s note: Weekly Wrap is taking the week off. It will return next Friday.

By Ilyse Wolens Schuman

Recent actions by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission were under scrutiny this week during a Senate hearing on wellness programs.

The EEOC bore the brunt of the criticism unleashed during the hearing for acting at odds with provisions the Affordable Care Act to promote the use of such programs. Both Democratic and Republican members of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions advocated employer-provided wellness programs, and asked witnesses to explain the difficulties they have faced in implementing such programs. Read more…

Benefits, HR News & Trends

What Is a Full-Time Employee? Senate Panel Hears It’s Not 30 Hours a Week

123RF Stock Photo

By Ilyse Wolens Schuman

During the first employment-related hearing conducted Friday by the new Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP), Senators and panelists debated whether the Affordable Care Act‘s definition of “full-time” employment should be amended.

Under the health care law’s employer responsibility requirements, employers with at least 100 full-time or full-time equivalent employees are now required to provide health insurance meeting certain ACA standards to their full-time employees or pay a penalty.

For employers with 50 to 100 full-time employees, this pay-or-play employer mandate becomes effective in 2016. The ACA considers a worker “full time” if he or she works 30 hours or more per week, instead of the customary 40 per week. Read more…