Classic TLNT

Classic TLNT

How to be a Good Boss – It’s Not as Simple as it Sometimes Looks

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

Here’s a great question that I almost never hear anyone ask, much less answer: How can you be a good boss?

This question popped into my mind while reading The Wall Street Journal’s India RealTime blog post that was titled, appropriately enough, How to be a Good Boss.

OK, I’ll bite. I’ve supervised people and been a boss for longer than I care to admit, and I’ve learned the hard way how to do it – through real life, on-the-job, thrown-into-the-breech experience. I’ve struggled to learn how to be a boss and a manager, and how to do it right. Read more…

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The One Critical Skill That Most Managers Never Seem to Learn

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.c

Let it go.

Since the beginning of time, those three words have never been repeated more frequently by more people or in more places than they have since the release of Frozen. Whatever else Elsa was singing about, however, she may as well have been delivering her primary message – let it go – to the modern manager.

Why is it that managers struggle to let things go? Read more…

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5 Hard Truths About Leadership That You Never Stop Learning

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

As an Organizational Development and Leadership practitioner, I often find myself having conversations about leadership – what it is and what it isn’t – and how to be a good leader.

It’s time for some truths.

So what are some hard truths about leadership? Read more…

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Your Talent Is Your Brand, So Why Do So Many Treat Talent So Badly?

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

A friend of mine posted this blurb on Facebook from an audio book he was listening to (note: I don’t know the name of said audio book):

Numerous studies have shown us that those given authority are more likely to lie, cheat and steal, while also being harsher in their judgments of others for doing these same things. Science tells us people with power feel less compassion for the suffering of others. Read more…

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Would One of Your Former Employees Really Want to Come Back?

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.Would you want to go back?

I was just asked for references, so it looks good — right?” read the text message. This young lady was in the throes of interviewing, and yes, I told her this is a good sign.

However what happened next caused both of us to do some thinking. As she reached out to her old boss and another former team member, the trajectory changed. Sure they would give her a reference, but more importantly, would she consider coming back? Read more…

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What Great Leaders Know: Sharing Power Builds Trust and Loyalty

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

This is not a deep psychology dive on ego and power in business leadership, which is a huge topic.

But I want to share some practical observations about how good leaders build a powerful team by sharing power, and how others build themselves up (falsely) by imagining they can hoard power personally. I am a fan of the former.

What I have found is that the people who imagine that they have more power than they do can’t distinguish between the fact that their role has power vs. that they are powerful personally. Read more…

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Poor Performance is Contagious, Especially If You Won’t Deal With It

Employee problem can't work

Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

As managers, at some point we all encounter an employee who frustrates us and drains the life and energy out of the team.

When you are in this situation with someone, you know it in your heart that you should act, particularly when they really annoy you. But, you don’t act right away because you second guess yourself, and you keep thinking, “they really do some things very well — sometimes…” Read more…

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The Two Most Important Decisions That a Manager Can Make

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

The first time I held a general management role, I had a mentor share something with me I found to be pretty life changing.

He said, “You need to worry about WHO and WHY. That’s it.

Here is why this is so important. Read more…

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Good Things Seem to Happen When You Trust Talented People

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

The best way to find out if you can trust somebody – is to trust them.” — Ernest Hemingway

I was preparing for this month’s webinar and I came across the above quote.

One of the best lessons I ever learned about performance management and delegating is, that if you trust talented people, good things happen. Read more…

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How Not to Get Sued For April Foolishness in the Workplace

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Editor’s Note: This popular TLNT post from 2013 seemed appropriate to bring back today.

There’s a distinct possibility that some of your employees will do something foolish today that could get you sued, fired or worse.

To help prevent that from happening, the following is our handy How Not to Get Sued for April Foolishness.

The April Fools’ Hall of Shame

Death. Serious injury. Emotional distress. Massive lawsuits. All have resulted from workplace pranks gone bad. Here are just a few examples:  Read more…