Articles tagged 'Best practices'

HR Insights, HR Management

Yes, Dad’s DO Have It a Lot Easier in the Workforce

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Max Shireson, the CEO of mongoDB, turned in his resignation this past week.

That announcement in itself isn’t really that big of a deal, CEOs turn in resignations every day. The reason he turned in his resignation is huge. I’ll let him tell it in his own words from a letter he sent to mongoDB’s workforce:

Earlier this summer, Matt Lauer asked Mary Barra, the CEO of GM, whether she could balance the demands of being a mom and being a CEO. The Atlantic asked similar questions of PepsiCo’s female CEO Indra Nooyi. As a male CEO, I have been asked what kind of car I drive and what type of music I like, but never how I balance the demands of being both a dad and a CEO. Read more…

Culture

Improving Engagement: It’s About Pumping Up Your Culture Muscle

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Leaders often struggle with managing approaches to improve engagement and ownership as part of a process that directly impacts results.

Company meetings, one-off engagement activities, and other approaches might work but there is a technique you should build into the fabric of your organization. It’s a relatively simple but powerful process that supports improved engagement, ownership, accountability, and results but requires some discipline and consistency.

The building culture muscle process

The concept of “building culture muscle” is extremely powerful and includes four very basic steps: Read more…

HR Insights, Talent Management

Is the Classic Job Description an Endangered Species?

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Several leading business journals recently have declared the job itself, as a vehicle for packaging work, to be on the endangered species list .

Commenting on the same phenomenon, Charles Savage describes “the rigor mortis of the industrial era” where the division of work and managerial supervision represented “structured distrust.” As the industrial era is replaced by the knowledge era, he predicts, both jobs and managers will be gone. Thus, making the need for the position description redundant.

While, this is, admittedly, a fairly radical stance, the Academy of Management Executive concurs: Read more…

Culture, Talent Management

Hiring For Core Values Is a Good Start, But There’s More to It Than That

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This won’t be surprising to regular readers of this blog, but I am a firm believer in the importance of hiring people who personally reflect your organization’s core values.

Why? Because it makes it that much easier to embed your values into the way they work every day.

Of course, I’m not unique in my thinking. I’m sure many of you agree with the approach. Read more…

Leadership

How I Went to Buy a Car and Got a Lesson in Great Leadership Instead

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When I walked into the MINI dealer to buy a new car, the last thing I expected to find was a great example of leadership, but that is exactly what I found.

It took a while for my early observations to draw the conclusion that the secret sauce of this dealership was the Sales Manager.

This busy, almost chaotic dealership was full of energy and organized. We were approached immediately by a salesperson who was quick to tell us that this was her first week, and she’d just moved from Pittsburgh. Read more…

Classic TLNT

The 8 Things That Make Talent Leaders Successful

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Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles. That’s why we republish a Classic TLNT post every Friday.

What makes a person an outstanding talent leader?

Is it the ability to set a vision, develop a strategy, or manage a budget? Or is it something much less visible and subtler?

Leadership is not something we are born with, although we may have a general aptitude. It takes insight into what leadership is all about and the desire to practice it in a deliberate, thoughtful, and consistent way to become good.

The points below amplify what I have learned from many successful leaders over the years. Read more…

Culture, Leadership

Is Teamwork Overrated? Only When Leaders Aren’t Really on the Team

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There’s no ‘I’ in team.”

“We appreciate you taking one for the team.”

“You’re not a team player.”

If the corporate realm has given birth to a more odious, misused, and abused word than “team,” I must confess that I don’t know what that is. Read more…

Recruiting and Staffing

The Myth of the Never-Ending Pool of Job Candidates

From istockphoto.com

There are many things broken in the cycle of recruitment, but in my opinion, a shift in mentality can save a lot of pain.

I am going to rip the Band-Aid off for you. Brace yourself.

There is NOT a never-ending pool of candidates.

The amount of data we have access to today, and the fact that it feels like you are constantly drowning in profiles of potential candidates, gives a false sense that the search is never-ending. Read more…

Rewards & Recognition

Workplace Appreciation Can Be Pretty Simple — and Effective

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 Do you think telling someone they’re doing great work on the job will fall on deaf ears? Research says differently.

In an economy where money is still tight, positive feedback can help keep employees motivated. In fact, according to a survey by Kelton Research nearly 50 percent of working Americans say they would rather be appreciated than have an opportunity to advance in their careers.

The study also found, with escalating workplace demands, employees aren’t feeling valued by executives and superiors. Read more…

Culture, Talent Management

Finding Change Agents: It’s the Critical Part of Change Management

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Change. It’s inevitable. Chances are you’re in the middle of a change initiative of some kind in your organization at this very moment.

What’s your attitude towards change? Excitement? Concern? Avoidance? Trepidation?

All of those are valuable and I can guarantee all are felt to one degree or another by every person in your organization.

But change is necessary. We cannot always remain as we are and continue to grow, develop and mature. Read more…