Articles tagged 'Company culture'

HR News & Trends

Weekly Wrap: 6 Critical Workforce Issues Companies Face

workforce 2020

Better get ready for all that “seat at the table” talk again.

Global enterprise software developer recently SAP partnered with Oxford Economics on a global study focused on the future of work, but it’s the six critical workforce issues facing HR professionals that they listed that got my attention — and should get yours. 

Workforce 2020 is the result of a survey of more than 5,400 employees and executives interviewed by Oxford Economics in 27 countries, and overall, the key finding is that two-thirds of businesses have not made significant progress toward building a workforce that will meet their future business objectives. Read more…

HR Insights, Talent Management

When Evaluating Performance, Perfect Is Not a Worthwhile Goal

From istockphoto.com

My youngest started fifth grade last week, and as I was combing through the official forms and literature, making sure he had all his school supplies and such, I happened upon the grading system:

HR Management, Leadership

Here’s What a Manager Must Really Learn to Communicate

Employee Communications

Your team creates all kinds of reports, spread sheets and slides to plan, run, measure, and report on what you are doing in your operation.

Of course you need these detailed materials to run your function — but please don’t inflict them on others!

These reports are your “Operational Tools.” Your operational tools are created in what I refer to as your “inside voice” — the language you use inside your organization — a robust language full of detail, acronyms and functional jargon. Read more…

Leadership

How You Can Put “Lead” Back Into Leadership

From istockphoto.com

Many people split the world into dualities: You’re either this or that. Positive or negative. On or off. Black or white.

But in reality, human behavior occurs mostly in the shades of gray between any two extremes. So when it comes to leadership, I hate to say, “You’re either part of the problem or part of the solution.

But it’s easy to see how it could be true. Read more…

Leadership, Talent Management

Why Is It That So Many Employees Don’t Trust Their Employers?

Lack of trust

More than half of us don’t believe our employers are open and upfront with us.

This disturbing news comes to us from the American Psychological Association’s 2014 Work and Well-Being Survey, which finds nearly 1 in 4 workers don’t trust their employers, 1 in 3 reported their employers aren’t always honest or truthful, and less than half believe employers are open and upfront.

This lack of trust in the workplace is a big deal, and is leading more than a quarter of U.S. employees to say they intend to seek new employment in the next year. Read more…

HR Management, HR News & Trends

How the Baltimore Ravens (and the NFL) Failed HR 101

RayRice2

By now everyone has seen former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, knock out his wife with two punches to the head in the elevator of an Atlantic City casino.

My question is this: Why didn’t anyone in the Baltimore Ravens’ organization see this before agreeing with the NFL to bring him back, initially, with only a two game suspension?

The Ravens (and the NFL) claim that no one in their organization saw the video from inside the casino elevator until it was leaked to TMZ this week. Do you buy that? Read more…

HR Management, Talent Management

Talent Management Gone Wrong: Why Can’t We Be Honest With People?

123RF Stock Photo

Last May, I posted a story of a young man who had been identified by a Fortune 100 firm as a high potential and placed into a leadership development program to prepare for the possibility of promotion into the executive ranks.

The story was unfinished, as a month after his Director left the organization and the young man had been appointed as interim Director, the VP told him that they were considering outsourcing the position.

The young man was disappointed, but he was determined to show the organization that he could handle the position as interim, on the chance that they decided to keep it in-house.

I described this process as “talent management gone wrong.” Read more…

Culture

Building Culture Is Always Better Than Trying to Transform It

123RF Stock Photo

Should we stop trying to transform culture?

During a recent keynote, Jeb Dasteel, Senior Vice President and Chief Customer Officer at Oracle Corporation, said something that gave me pause.

“Don’t try to change the culture,” Dasteel urged the hundreds of change agents gathered in a hotel conference room. “Exploit it.”

Dasteel went on to explain that, while building a customer experience strategy inside Oracle — a company that had historically valued its intellectual property more than its customers — he chose to leverage the prevailing engineering mindset, instead of trying to change the organizational culture, as so many of us might be tempted to do. Read more…

Talent Management

How to Crank Up Creativity in Your Workplace

Photo illustration by Dreamstime.

In the not too distant past, one good idea could catapult an organization to long-term success.

Companies were able to leverage a new product or service to their advantage for several years, and creative output was tasked to a select few employees.

But now, dramatically shorter business cycles and customers obsessed with novelty and “what have you done for me lately?” have reduced many of those advantages, requiring all of us to crank up our creativity quotient in the workplace. Read more…

HR Insights

It Kills Creativity When You Talk a Good Idea to Death

123RF Stock Photo

Excessive talking can be dangerous to your business and your life.

Tongue-wagging may not send you to the ER with heart-palpitations, blot clots, or cancerous tumors, but it can kill many good ideas before they’re executed.

Take Mike, for example. A colleague of mine and professor at a local university, Mike has been telling me for the past 10-12 years that he’s going to write a book on the fundamental skills of supervision. He even sent me a pitch letter once intended for an agent he’d met at a conference and asked for feedback. Read more…