Articles tagged 'Compensation'

HR News & Trends, Recruiting and Staffing

Skilled Worker Shortages Are Slowly Starting to Push Pay Upward

Salary increase1

Reports from the Federal Reserve say that a shortage of skilled workers in a variety of trades are showing up here and there across the U.S., putting upward pressure on pay.

Employers are having to pay more to attract workers in construction and manufacturing in several parts of the U.S. In parts of the Midwest, mid-Atlantic region, and the Northern Plains states, transportation workers are seeing somewhat higher pay. And in New York the number of workers quitting to take higher paying jobs is on the rise. Read more…

Compensation, HR News & Trends

Here’s Why Women (and Men) Really Do Need to Ask For a Raise

From istockphoto.com

Last week, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella gave some spectacularly bad advice to a group of women at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference in Phoenix.

He said:

It’s not really about asking for the raise but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along,”

I was originally supposed to be at this event, and it’s probably a good thing that my plans changed because I think I would have had to be physically restrained to not run up on the stage and shout, “He’s wrong! Please don’t do this!Read more…

Benefits, Compensation, HR Management

Is it Really Time to Say Goodbye to the Merit Matrix?

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Bill Kutik hates the merit matrix and I suspect he is not alone.

The merit matrix is not dead — not yet, with recent WorldatWork research confirming that about three-quarters of surveyed member organizations (which tend to be larger, more well-established employers) have a merit matrix in place. But should it be? Will it be?

In his recent HR Technology column at HREOnline, Death to the Merit-Pay-Increase Matrix, Kutik (co-chair emeritus of the annual HR Technology Conference and Exhibition that is going on this week in Las Vegas), shared his issues with the matrix: Read more…

Compensation, Talent Management

Pay and Performance, or What Withholding an Increase Can Do

123RF Stock Photo

More pay might not change behavior, but withholding an increase sometimes will.

“That’s the last straw! I’m going to fire him,” said the irate mayor as he hung up the phone after mollifying a furious resident.

His city’s veteran long-service street superintendent had once again rudely blown off another citizen with a legitimate gripe. The mayor was tired of cleaning up such messes and being forced to calm down upset voters antagonized by the impolite official. Read more…

Compensation, HR Insights

Should You “Out” Employees and Make Public What They’re Paid?

Transparency

In a few weeks, I am going to talk with a local compensation association about pay transparency.

As I’ve been writing over the last few months, I think there’s a cultural shift underway, with pressure building from various angles to “out” employee pay.

It’s natural that employers in Silicon Valley are feeling the most pressure. Many of its company cultures strive to live up to open communications standards like “don’t be evil.” The rest scramble to lure talent away from these companies, even though their own devotion to core values is not as obvious to employees. Read more…

Compensation, Rewards & Recognition

The Problem When Managers Get Too Fond of Discretionary Rewards

© Dawn Hudson - Fotolia.com

Ah, management discretion.

Leaders often have a great fondness for discretionary rewards, particularly in bonus and incentive plans.

And why not? Discretionary rewards keep all the power and control with them. Wild card in hand, they are free until the moment the reward decision is made to do whatever feels right, based on their personal judgment call. Read more…

Compensation, Rewards & Recognition

Retention and Reward: Struggling With the Consequences

Illustration by Dreamstime

Employee retention is a double-edged sword.

According to Merriam Webster, in addition to being a sword with two sharp edges, this is defined as something that can have both favorable and unfavorable consequences.

That’s about right. Read more…

HR News & Trends, Legal Issues

Not Paying Employees On Time? It’s Considered an FLSA Violation

123RF Stock Photo

By John E. Thompson

A recent decision by the U.S. Court of Federal Claims underscores important propositions under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act to the effect that:

  • Failing to pay non-exempt employees the FLSA-required minimum-wage or overtime compensation by the next regular payday for the workweek (or by the next regular payday for the longer pay-period in which the workweek ends) after they can be determined violates the FLSA, and
  • Such violations give rise to claims under the FLSA for “liquidated damages,” even if the employee is later paid the underlying required wages. Read more…
HR News & Trends

2015 Salary Survey: It’s Another Year – and Another Mediocre 3% Increase

Salary increase1

Is the U.S. economy really improving?

Some people want to think it is, but if you look at the early projections for 2015 salary increases and consider such increases as a strong economic indicator, it’s barely growing — at best.

In other words, it’s time to get ready for another 3 percent raise next year.

Consulting giant Mercer just came out with their 2014/2015 U.S. Compensation Planning Survey, and “the average raise in base pay is expected to be 3.0 percent in 2015.” This is roughly in line with the early numbers from the WorldatWork’s 2014-2015 Salary Budget Survey that projects a 3.1 percent salary increase in the U.S. next year, up from the 3.0 percent employees received in 2014. Read more…

Benefits, Compensation

The Problem When You Have a Pay-For-Pulse Compensation Strategy

Photo by istockphoto.com

Picture the scene:

Your company doesn’t have enough money in the annual merit spend budget to grant more than an average  2 percent increase to employees, so the powers that be decide “let’s give everyone a flat 2 percent increase and call it a day.

Has this happened to you? The practice is what some would call a “pay-for-pulse” strategy, where if you haven’t been fired on the date of the scheduled increase, then you’re going to get a raise.

Every warm body who occupies a chair at that time will receive an increase — just because. Read more…