Articles tagged 'HR basics'

Compensation, Legal Issues

FLSA Changes Could Make Many Retail Managers Non-Exempt Employees

flsa

By John E. Thompson

Expectations are that the U.S. Labor Department’s proposed regulations re-defining the federal Fair Labor Standards Act‘s executive, administrative, professional, outside-sales, and derivative exemptions will be released in the next few weeks, if not within days.

As we have said, these provisions will probably include:

  • A substantial increase in the minimum salary amount; and,
  • A significant narrowing of the duties-related requirements. Read more…
Classic TLNT

See If These Sound Familiar: The Biggest Lies You Always Hear From HR

Photo illustration by istockphoto.com

Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday we republish a Classic TLNT post.

In my never ending quest to beat a blog series to death, let’s hope this is my last installment of “Top Lies.” (See How Job Candidates Lie, and the Best Lies They Always Seem to Tell, and, Please Don’t Hate Me! Here Are the Biggest Lies That Recruiters Tell).

At this point, I’ve completely pissed off “candidates” and made some fun of recruiters, so now it’s time to really have some fun with the easiest target of all — HR! Read more…

HR Basics, HR Management

Putting Out the Fire: Dealing With Conflict in Your Workplace

123rfphoto.com

How many times have you witnessed conflict between employees create uncomfortable tension at work?

No matter how hard you try to avoid it, the fire continues to burn, greatly affecting the atmosphere, which in turn affects everyone’s productivity.

The truth of the matter is that on-the-job conflict is unavoidable. Fortunately, there are ways to find a resolution in a quick and professional manner. Read more…

HR Basics, Recruiting and Staffing

Rejection Letter Dos and Don’ts: How to Treat People With a Little Decency

123rf.com

A number of years ago I got rejected for a job.

I know, I know, you are probably as surprised as I was. The funny part is, I got the hard copy, snail mail rejection letter 18 months after I had apparently applied. I went back into my email to try to figure out what really happened.

You see, as a Recruiting Pro, I wouldn’t actually apply through an ATS, especially for an executive position, which this was. My email confirmed that fact; I had sent the Chief HR Officer of a large organization my resume directly. This rejection letter was from that contact. Read more…

HR Basics, Talent Management

You Shouldn’t Ignore Criminal Records When Checking Candidates

From istockphoto.com

The scenario may seem familiar, whether through a real life experience or something you saw on TV.

You interview a candidate and it appears as if they would be perfect for a position with your company. But then, it’s revealed through their admission or a criminal background check that they had a past run-in with the law.

In every other way, the interviewee absolutely shines and would be a credit to your organization. You might be tempted to brush the information aside and hire him or her anyway. Read more…

Compensation, Legal Issues

More Erroneous Nonsense on Tipped Wages, Courtesy of the Labor Dept.

minimum wage

By John E. Thompson

A recent post appearing on the U.S. Department of Labor’s blog begins, “The federal tipped minimum wage has been $2.13/hour since 1991. That’s right – it’s been the same for nearly a quarter century.

Actually, that’s wrong.

As we explained previously, there is no such thing as a purportedly lower “tipped minimum wage.” The federal Fair Labor Standards Act’s minimum wage for tipped employees is precisely the same as for all other non-exempt, non-tipped workers: $7.25 an hour at present. Read more…

HR Basics, Recruiting and Staffing

Can You Reject an Applicant For Falsifying Their Job Application?

Photo by Dreamstime

Most job candidates know that falsifying a job application is grounds for being denied employment.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t always stop them from doing it, however most understand the consequences if they get caught.

Conversely, most employers are conditioned to believe they are well within their rights to deny employment on the basis that someone lied on the job application. In fact, I recently conducted a webinar and was asked if it is easier to deny employment based on an application omission or fabrication discovered on a background check rather than going through the adverse action process. Read more…

Talent Management

Improving Performance: You Can Help Employees Without Going to a PIP

Photo illustration by istockphoto.com

You have an employee that is not meeting performance expectations and you need them to either step up their game or move on. There are a few routes you can take.

  • One is to engage in a proactive feedback and coaching strategy.
  • An alternative is to go the official route and work with your HR department to put the employee on a Performance Improvement Plan (PIP).

Let’s just bluntly get out of the way what we all know to be true: PIPs have absolutely nothing to do with performance improvement. Read more…

HR Insights, HR Management

Planning For the Worst: Compassion Is the Key When Layoffs Come

© antiksu - Fotolia

“Are we all set. Yes, we are all in compliance with the cost savings. All the numbers are correct. Just give me the go ahead and they are all gone.”

Then the conversation changed.

The executive listening to this rundown told the HR person to stop. Do you know any of these people? The answer was no.

Do you know whether it will be difficult for them to find jobs in your area? “I have no idea” was his reply. Read more…

HR Basics, Legal Issues

Why Your Handbook Needs to Be Clear on Taking FMLA Leave

FMLA_poster

By Eric B. Meyer

A few missing words in your employee handbook words may open your FMLA floodgates, and you wouldn’t want to make the same egregious mistake as a Michigan employer recently did.

The Family and Medical Leave Act permits eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks off in a 12-month period for, among other things, a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the functions of the position of such employee.

To be eligible for FMLA leave, an employee must work for a covered employer and: Read more…