Articles tagged 'HR communications'

HR Insights, HR Management

Do You Really Need to Write an HR Policy For THAT?

Dreamstime.com

My husband calls them “blond moments” when he shows me a cartoon and I don’t get it.

I’m also a bit gullible when I read spoofs and satires. No, thank you – I don’t need oceanfront property in Arizona.

Today he sent an article from The Onion which I got right away. Yes, I know The Onion is a satirical publication; I learned that when I took him a story I thought was true, and he chuckled for about an hour.

I actually did a double take on the one he sent today – HR Director Reminds Employees That Any Crying Done At Office Must Be Work-Related. Oh my, I hope not. Oh, I get it – it’s a spoof! LOL. Read more…

Culture, Talent Management

Want a Good Measure of a Company? It’s How They Treat Those Who Quit

Photo by Dreamstime

I left my first post-college professional position after a little over four years on the job.

In that time, I had worked my tail off for the organization with 60-80 hour weeks as the norm, had been promoted twice, and had built a program that was one of the most innovative and forward thinking in the industry.

In return, after I gave my notice, I was refused any future reference (beyond confirming dates of employment), had no acknowledgement of my contribution, and was more or less treated like a leper for my remaining two weeks. Read more…

Recruiting and Staffing

Why You Need to Make Hiring a One-Day Affair

From istockphoto.com

The average time to fill an average job in the United States is 25 days. Unfortunately, in many cases top candidates are no longer available after 10 days.

You may think that making quick hiring decisions would lower the quality of your hire, but the reality is that in most cases, the reverse is true.

The very best candidates are in high demand. They are likely to receive multiple offers. And because they are decisive individuals, they are likely to accept another offer before most corporate processes are only one-third completed. Read more…

HR Insights, HR Management

The Things You Need to Do to Be Happy and Successful at HR

© noppyviva - Fotolia

I spend a lot of time talking about what makes HR professionals fail, but I have strong opinions on the key attributes that make human resources leaders successful.

Here are four (4):

1. Great HR leaders are dependable and reliable

Everybody wants innovative and disruptive until you actually give them innovative and disruptive. Then they want steady and trustworthy. Read more…

Talent Management

Is Employee Engagement Really As Bad As the Surveys Say It Is?

123RF Stock Photo

Why is it that every other article I read on employee engagement begins by quoting alarming figures on the state of the global workforce?

They all seem to be variation on a theme, something along the lines of:

Less than 15 percent of employees across the globe are engaged in their work. The vast majority of employees are psychologically absent from their workplace, and are unlikely to be making a positive contribution.” Read more…

HR Management, Talent Management

The Challenge of Dealing with Difficult People and Difficult Conversations

© aliasching - Fotolia

Often when working with groups or coaching individuals on how to engage people in constructive conversations around difficult issues, I’ll have someone say “Why do I have to be the one to do all the work? They’re the ones with the problem.”

They then go on to explain how the other person is the one who A) behaved badly; B) isn’t doing their job; C) acted inappropriately.

They bristle at the suggestion that THEY do the work to “get their head and heart right” before the conversation, as I recommend. I’ve found over the years, from both personal and professional experience, that the time spent getting into a more productive emotional state and a wiser, more thoughtful mental state before the conversation is time well spent. Read more…

Recruiting and Staffing

Hiring Wisdom: Yes, Active Applicants Are Better Than Passive Candidates

123RF Stock Photo

Most active job applicants either don’t have a job because of something out of their control (like layoffs or mergers) or they are still working, but are looking for a better situation.

I have to admit, you would not want to hire some of them, but there are a lot of passive candidates (the ones who are not looking, who you go after) that could turn out to be just as bad or even worse. Read more…

Benefits, Talent Management

Dealing With Employee Stress: The Answer Is Right in Front of Them

© haru_natsu_kobo - Fotolia

The job-stress connection isn’t new. It’s been around as long as the concept of employment.

So if it’s always been there, why should businesses worry about it? And why now?

There’s a simple answer to these questions: Employee stress costs every company money. Sometimes a lot of money. And it’s a bigger problem now than ever before. Read more…

Recruiting and Staffing, Talent Management

You Need a Smart Retention Strategy, Because It’s Not 2011 Anymore

123RF Stock Photo

I opened my email last week to see a message from a dear friend that said, “I resigned!!!! I pulled the trigger!!”

My friend and I have talked FOR YEARS about her unhappiness and lack of engagement, about the corporate politics and leadership egos that consume her days, about the constant pressure to do more with fewer people and resources, and about her exit strategy.

That’s right. She has had an exit strategy, and she has been refining and polishing it for years. Like the best strategic plans, it was deliberate, well-thought-out and executed over a multi-year time frame. Read more…

Classic TLNT

The Warning Signs of a Highly Disengaged Employee

disengaged-workers

Editor’s Note: Readers frequently ask about past TLNT articles, so every Friday, we republish a Classic TLNT post.

The world is an unhappy place when you don’t like your job.

Job dissatisfaction is the gateway to disengagement, disengagement leads to lowered performance, and lowered performance affects your bottom line.

However, if an employee is disengaged, they rarely verbalize it to their manager — which is a problem. Managers must not only be able to recognize the non-verbal cues of disengagement, but also take steps to re-engage the employee in a positive way. Read more…