Articles tagged 'HR communications'

Talent Management

Here’s the Single Most Important Thing You Need to Drive Retention

retention

From awards to perks, managers can run themselves into the ground seeking ways to keep employees happy so they won’t wander off to another company.

But what if the answer wasn’t in the perks, or the money, or even a fancy new break room complete with a Keurig?

It’s true; coffee and snacks will not inspire your employees to stay put — BambooHR’s survey confirms it. Less than 1 percent of respondents selected “free food and perks” as something that would have “helped them stay” at a job they quit after only working there for six months. Read more…

Culture

The Key to Succeeding After a Merger: Overcoming the Win-Lose Mindset

Mergers

Every day in the news lately you read about the latest mergers: Airlines, pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies, large retailers like Staples and Office Depot, all consolidating for so many business reasons.

Some are successful and create flourishing companies that benefit stockholders and employee’s careers. But here’s the really scary reality: It’s been well documented over many years that up to one-third of mergers fail within five years, and as many as 80 percent never live up to their full potential.

The main reason for this is what has been called “cultural clash.” Read more…

Talent Management

Feedback Is Really Critical (But, Don’t Say Anything Negative!)

© kasahasa - Fotolia

In an article sure to inspire a good bit of negative “kids today!” comments, The Wall Street Journal recently published an article on a “kinder, softer” approach to performance management and the performance review process.

Here’s an excerpt:

Accentuate the positive has become a new mantra at workplaces like VMware Inc., Wayfair Inc., and the Boston Consulting Group Inc., where bosses now dole out frequent praise, urge employees to celebrate small victories, and focus performance reviews around a particular worker’s strengths — instead of dwelling on why he flubbed a client presentation… Read more…

HR News & Trends, Legal Issues

Yes, Your Independent Contractors SHOULD Release Employment Claims

123RF Stock Photo

Editor’s Note: Weekly Wrap is taking the week off. It will return next Friday.

By Eric B. Meyer

Here’s a thought: Consider requiring your new independent contractors to release employment claims.

What the hell are you talking about, Eric? Why would we make an independent contractor sign a release of employment claims before starting work for our company?

I’m so glad you asked.   Read more…

HR Basics, HR Management

Four Steps to Less Dreadful (and Stressful) Performance Reviews

performance

If your role involves managing employees, you most likely have something in common with just about every other manager — you dread performance review time.

On the other side of this is your employee, who probably looks forward to the process being over just as much as you do.

It’s a similar scene for many companies; create the annual review for each employee and ask them to fill out a self-evaluation form as well. Set a time to meet, and awkwardly discuss each other’s feedback. And we wonder why no one seems to embrace the annual performance review process. Read more…

HR Basics, Recruiting and Staffing

Rejection Letter Dos and Don’ts: How to Treat People With a Little Decency

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A number of years ago I got rejected for a job.

I know, I know, you are probably as surprised as I was. The funny part is, I got the hard copy, snail mail rejection letter 18 months after I had apparently applied. I went back into my email to try to figure out what really happened.

You see, as a Recruiting Pro, I wouldn’t actually apply through an ATS, especially for an executive position, which this was. My email confirmed that fact; I had sent the Chief HR Officer of a large organization my resume directly. This rejection letter was from that contact. Read more…

Leadership, Talent Management

What Are You Doing to Keep the Best of the Best?

best of the best

The movie Whiplash — the story of a young talented drummer and his demanding and ruthless teacher — is garnering a lot of attention (it’s been nominated for five Oscars) and it’s also kickstarting a lot of discussion.

What is the role of a teacher or coach? To what lengths should we go to elicit the best from someone? How do we motivate and not break people on the way to helping them reach their pinnacle?

These questions are relevant on school campuses, playing fields and the workplace. While I believe that everyone needs to get voted on the team and bring their A-game every day, I don’t believe the antiquated type of coaching works.

The world needs more talent than we have. Yes, we have a talent crisis. Read more…

HR Insights, HR Management

They’re Yours to Lose — The Impact of Good and Bad Bosses

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Last week, while listening to a friend weigh the pros and cons of a potential job offer, I started thinking about what I call the Unholy Work Trinity (UWT) — Relationship with Boss, Job Tasks, and Compensation.

The UWT exists in a delicate balance, and when any of the three parts becomes the source of mild dissatisfaction, a bit of angst usually sets in.

When an employee becomes significantly dissatisfied with one part of the UWT, however, the angst can escalate into disgruntlement. If that same employee becomes significantly dissatisfied with two or more parts of the UWT, a change is comin’ on. Read more…

HR Insights, Leadership

Mastering the Soft Skills: 5 Unspoken Rules Every Manager Should Know

soft-skills

There are unspoken rules that exist in the workplace that colleges don’t teach and HR rarely trains on, and those rules are a powerful influence of who advances and who does not.

These are the “soft skills” that organizational leaders wish more of their managers and people understood.

Here’s a crash course in just five of those unspoken rules. Read more…

Benefits, Legal Issues

Can Employers Mandate Vaccinations During a Disease Outbreak?

measles

By Paul Starkman

Recently, vaccinations and public health have dominated the national conversation.

Much of the focus is on the more than 141 confirmed cases of measles in the United States. Measles has been confirmed in 19 states and Washington D.C., including 107 cases in California.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, measles is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Measles can be serious, even deadly, especially for children younger than 5-years-old and those with weakened immune systems such as people battling cancer. Read more…