Articles tagged 'HR values'

Culture, HR Insights

Why Today’s Businesses Must Become “Enlightened Organizations”

From istockphoto.com

Call it a combination of ohhhhm and aha!

Those simple, powerful sounds sum up what my colleagues and I think is crucial for organizations when it comes to talent these days.

That is, companies need to be “Enlightened Organizations” in order to be great workplaces and to be successful.

We mean “Enlightened” in both the Eastern and Western senses of the term. Eastern in the sense of principles of wisdom, kindness and harmony. Western in the sense of the Age of Enlightenment, and its concepts of scientific inquiry, progress and analysis. Read more…

Culture, Leadership

Evolving Your Workplace Culture: History Shows It Takes a Bold Vision

123RF Stock Photo

CEO’s continue to publicly proclaim their efforts to manage significant and meaningful culture change.

Some miss the mark and show their lack of understanding this critical topic. Others, like Satya Nadella of Microsoft, share a much clearer vision and appear like they truly “get it.”

What separates the visionary and capable culture champions from the vast majority of leaders that don’t understand the culture fundamentals? Read more…

HR Insights, Talent Management

The Top 5 Workplace Time Traps

123RF Stock Photo

Remember cartoon character George Jetson’s grueling two-hour workday, which earned him a deluxe apartment in the sky? Whatever happened to that future?

Instead of enjoying a shrinking work week due to better technology, as we’ve expected for decades, the average American work week has actually grown to nearly 60 hours!

How is it that we have less discretionary time and work harder than ever, even though technological breakthroughs have made us all incredibly productive? Read more…

HR Insights, HR Management

Have You Really Given It Any Thought: Why Are You in HR?

I love HR

Why are you in HR?

Perhaps I could end this post with the title alone because it’s a poignant question. If you work in HR or make money off of HR, have you asked yourself lately why you are here?

Most will say they work in HR because they “love to work with people,” or they “like making a difference in organizations.” The funny thing is, the more you work in HR the more you find that the relationship you have with your employees is a bit of a sordid tale, and that making a difference is a periodic win that graces you with its presence maybe every solar eclipse.

So again I ask — why are you in HR? Read more…

HR News & Trends, Weekly Wrap

What We Can Learn From the Worst Thing a Manager Must Do

Photo illustration by istockphoto.com

Regular readers of my semi-regular Friday posts know that I sometimes mention The New York Times’ You’re the Boss blog because I often find it to be the source of great insight into talent management and HR.

What I like most is how You’re the Boss reduces issues that just about everyone deals with in organizations of all sizes to bite-sized specifics that are applicable to just about anyone managing people just about anywhere.

Here’s a case in point, and just the headline of the blog post sucks you into it — What I Learned From Firing My Employee of 20 Years. Read more…

Classic TLNT

What Great Leaders Know: Sharing Power Builds Trust and Loyalty

be_a_great_leader_follow_me_tshirt-p235157158009334879zvf9d_400

Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles. That’s why we republish a Classic TLNT post every Friday.

This is not a deep psychology dive on ego and power in business leadership, which is a huge topic.

But I want to share some practical observations about how good leaders build a powerful team by sharing power, and how others build themselves up (falsely) by imagining they can hoard power personally. I am a fan of the former.

What I have found is that the people who imagine that they have more power than they do can’t distinguish between the fact that their role has power vs. that they are powerful personally. Read more…

Talent Management

Great Tales of Engagement: Pizza on the Plane – With a Little Bit of Help

frontier-airlines-buys-pizza

Here’s one thing that’s good to remember: one highly engaged employee can make a world of difference.

Take the case of Frontier Airlines, a Colorado-based air carrier  that earned dubious title of Second-Most-Complained-About-Carrier in 2013 (in fairness, Spirit Airlines, the No. 1 most-complained-about-carrier, outnumbered Frontier’s complaints by almost 8-to-1).

However, 2014 is looking brighter for Frontier, and they’ve enjoyed a boost in positive awareness since a story broke about an enterprising Frontier pilot teamed up with a Domino’s Pizza manager to deliver a customer experience his passengers won’t soon forget.

Sound like the plot to a new primetime drama? Wrong. It’s employee engagement at its finest. Read more…

HR Insights

How Good Are You, and How Much Good Is Your Company Doing?

123RF Stock Photo

When you hear the word “good,” what do you think of? How do you define it?

The natural inclination is to describe “good” as the opposite of “bad,” but independent policy advisor Simon Anholt has another definition – “good” as the opposite of “selfish.” And that’s the definition he uses in his new Good Country Index.

Watch this brilliant TedX video given by Mr. Anholt for more details. It’s well worth your time. Read more…

HR Insights, HR Management

You Want to Work In HR? Are You Ready to Change the Status Quo?

hr_advice

I am meeting more people these days who want to work in HR and I usually ask them why – not because I don’t think it’s a good idea, but because HR’s role and it’s true potential for impact is misunderstood.

Usually the answers are admirable. like “I really like helping people,” or “I want to help businesses figure out how to treat staff better,” or something along those lines.

But most HR people will tell you that sometimes we don’t make people happy — and that’s not a bad thing. Read more…

Leadership

4 Ways to Help Take Your Team From Good to Great

123RF Stock Photo

No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking.”Voltaire, French writer and philosopher

While perfection may not be possible, there’s no reason not to strive for it — as long as you don’t focus so tightly on that goal you can’t actually accomplish anything.

Instead, by continually improving your systems, processes, and productivity over time, you’ll go from mediocre to superior.

I realize some readers might look askance at this idea, since just about every CEO in America has read Jim Collins’ 2001 book Good to Great. If upgrading from good to great were easy, then why do every day companies still outnumber the great by a factor of hundreds to one? Read more…