Articles tagged 'Rewards & recognition'

HR Insights, Talent Management

Yes, Money Can Buy Happiness, but Employee Pride Is Not for Sale

proud

Imagine that you are walking alone across a vacant parking lot on a breezy day, when out of the corner of your eye you notice a crumpled-up bill blowing at your feet.

You immediately step on it to keep it from escaping, and then reach down to discover that it’s a $100 bill. No one is within 500 yards of you, and the wind is swirling leaves and other bits of paper around as far as you can see. You couldn’t find the rightful owner if your life depended on it.

The bill is yours to keep. Read more…

Compensation, Rewards & Recognition

A Paycheck Is Not Enough Recognition for a Job Well Done

From istockphoto.com

One statement sure to raise my ire when discussing the Power of Thanks in the workplace is: “They get paid to do their job. That’s recognition enough.”

It’s a patently false statement. Pay and recognition serve very different needs, but they are in a symbiotic relationship when it comes to fulfilling those employee needs.

All the recognition in the world won’t help resolve an underpaid employee’s base needs in terms of Maslow’s Hierarchy. And pay raises, consistently and appropriately given, won’t meet the higher-order employee needs, either. Read more…

Recruiting and Staffing, Rewards & Recognition

Employee Retention: It’s Really a Workplace “Stickiness” Problem

© auremar - Fotolia

“People just don’t stick around like they used to.”

How often have you heard that phrase in terms of employee retention goals, usually coupled with statements about “there’s just no loyalty anymore.”

History shows that’s just not true. For the last 25 years, tenure has been consistently low across nearly all age ranges. And the youngest generation in the workplace tends to stay the shortest amount of time (which is not surprising considering where they are in their careers).

More recent data published in The Wall Street Journal shows average tenure across occupations doesn’t even reach five (5) years. Read more…

Culture, Talent Management

Here’s Why Peer Relationships Are Everything In The Workplace

Photo by istockphoto.com

Employees with more friends at work are more engaged, according to the Fall 2014 MoodTracker Report released by Globoforce.

Only 28 percent of employees who reported having no friends at work were engaged, while 69 percent who reported having at least 25 friends were highly engaged.

The implications are clear: We need more friends at work. Read more…

Rewards & Recognition, Talent Management

What’s More Important to Employees? Base Pay or Recognition?

From istockphoto.com

What’s more to employees important: Base pay, or being appreciated for their work?

A recent survey released by Boston Consulting Group polled more than 200,000 employees around the world to create a definitive list of the 10 top factors for on-the-job happiness.

What employees really value

They found that employees value the following (in order of importance): Read more…

Rewards & Recognition, Talent Management

Why Your Employees Are Leaving (and How You Can Win Them Back)

Iquit

Employee turnover is a fact of life. And as it turns out, not even the most in-demand employers are immune.

Earlier this year, rumors were circulating that “tons of engineers” were ready to leave Google after employees received underwhelming year-end bonuses, and Elon Musk recently claimed that Apple was offering his employees a $250,000 signing bonus to leave Tesla.

Turnover is costly to any enterprise, but especially to high-profile companies like Google and Tesla. Not only do you lose valuable team members, but also an employee who quits can cost up to 150 percent of his or her salary to replace. Read more…

HR News & Trends

Weekly Wrap: Employee Appreciation? It’s Not As Good as You Might Think

© kikkerdirk - Fotolia

Here’s a sobering statistic to ponder on Employee Appreciation Day: Nearly half (47 percent) of employees recently surveyed say they either don’t feel appreciated or feel only somewhat appreciated at work.

This comes from a new online survey in February by Harris Poll for The Workforce Institute at Kronos Incorporated, a company that makes sophisticated time and attendance software. Although the findings are pretty interesting, they aren’t terribly surprising given all that we read and hear about the mindset of the workforce today. Read more…

Rewards & Recognition, Talent Management

Creating an Attitude of Gratitude in Your Organization Every Day

employee_appreciation_day

No matter what role an employee plays within your organization – answering the phones, closing sales deals or managing a large team – there is one characteristic that they all have in common: the need to be recognized and appreciated for their work.

Many say that appreciation is just as important as other critical factors like compensation and career development. In fact, for the Millennial generation, feeling appreciated is an absolute must-have to remain engaged.

Regardless of which generation they fall into, employees want to know that you are grateful for their contributions. What’s more, beyond simply making everyone feel good, ensuring your employees feel valued has tremendous benefits for your company’s bottom line. Read more…

Rewards & Recognition

What Legacy Will YOU Leave With Your Organization?

legacy

Someday, you will leave your current organization.

You may retire. You may move. You may choose to continue your career elsewhere.

Regardless of the reason you leave, your time in your current organization will be remembered by others. How will they remember you?

Read more…

HR Management, Talent Management

Public Service Announcement: Please Ignore This Advice from SHRM

bad-advice

I think the SHRM weekly email distribution list may have been hacked because that’s that only acceptable explanation for what I found in my email box this week.

The subject line of the email stared with “Employee Appreciation Day,” and that was enough to get me to open the email.

The first bullet point in the email was this: