Articles tagged 'Social Media'

HR Insights, HR Management

In the Workplace, Time Spent on Social Media May Be a Bad ROI

© arrow - Fotolia.com

Every hiring manager has a story about someone who has botched a job interview or torpedoed a career due to thoughtless comments on social media sites.

I know someone whose close friend, a technical writer, lost his job after making negative comments about his company’s investment prospects on MySpace (remember them?).

Few people think twice about posting embarrassing party pictures on their Facebook pages or casual trash-talk on Twitter. However, your prospective employer or current company also has an online presence, so you are the face of the company. Accordingly, they may keep an eye on you, which is not tough when you voluntarily post content for the world to see. Read more…

Recruiting and Staffing

Screening Candidates on Social Media: 5 Keys in Doing It Effectively

© arrow - Fotolia.com

Should you use social media to screen candidates?

The answer in most cases is YES, but you should also be careful when doing so.

According to a survey conducted by Reppler, 91 percent of businesses are already using social media, in some form, to review candidates. Since most companies appear to be doing so already, the question really becomes, how to effectively use social media without putting your business at risk. Read more…

HR News & Trends, Legal Issues

Rhode Island Latest State to Ban Access to Employee Online Content

123RF Stock Photo

By Philip L. Gordon and Joon Hwang

Rhode Island recently became the fifth state in 2014 and the 17th state nationwide to enact legislation restricting access by employers to applicants’ and employees’ personal online content.

The Rhode Island law follows similar laws enacted this year by Wisconsin, Tennessee, Oklahoma, and Louisiana, continuing a nationwide trend that began in spring 2012.

Rhode Island’s new law embodies many of the prohibitions seen in similar laws. However, in comparison to similar laws, the new law provides relatively narrow exceptions that allow employers to protect their legitimate business interest. Read more…

HR News & Trends, Legal Issues

Inappropriate Facebook Posts Doom Employee’s Discrimination Claims

Facebook Logo

By Eric B. Meyer

On the clock or off, when employees do dumb stuff on Facebook, it could cost them their jobs. And, apparently, their discrimination claims against their former employer, too.

Yep, another employee screwed up online. Go figure.

In Brown v. Tyson Foods, Inc., the plaintiff was suspended after her employer learned that a video on Facebook showed her “shaking her tail” and placing money in the shirt of a male co-worker who was performing an “exotic” dance at work. Read more…

HR News & Trends, Legal Issues

Yes, It’s Wrong to Disclose Employee Medical Info on Facebook

FacebookLarge_3

By Eric B. Meyer

Yes, disclosing an employee’s medical info on Facebook is stupid, plus, it may violate the Americans with Disabilities Act, too.

In Shoun v. Best Formed Plastics, Inc., the plaintiff allegedly suffered a bad shoulder injury at work. And, after the plaintiff reported it, the person who processed worker’s compensation claims for his company, posted the following on her Facebook page:

Isn’t [it] amazing how Jimmy experienced a 5 way heart bypass just one month ago and is back to work, especially when you consider George Shoun’s shoulder injury kept him away from work for 11 months and now he is trying to sue us.” Read more…

HR News & Trends, Legal Issues

Court: No 1st Amendment Protection For Teacher Trash-Talking Online

Natalie Munroe

By Eric B. Meyer

Do you remember Natalie Munroe?

She’s the teacher who enjoyed a cup of coffee in the spotlight a few years ago after getting suspended for bashing her students on her personal blog.

Among other things, she described her students as argumentative f*cks who may engage in Columbine-style shootings.

Out of all this, back in June of 2012, she sued her employer, alleging that her employer deprived her of First Amendment constitutional rights. Read more…

Classic TLNT

Are You Googling Job Candidates? When You Do, Everyone Loses

google

Editor’s Note: Readers sometimes ask about past TLNT articles. That’s why we republish a Classic TLNT post every Friday.

Years ago, I asked HR professionals to stop Googling candidates.

In short, it is dumb and lazy.

It is an unreliable and invalid way of discerning a candidate’s knowledge, skills and abilities. And I believe it might be an illegal hiring practice, although there is no legal decision or class action lawsuit against an employer in America to test that theory. Read more…

HR News & Trends, Legal Issues

How Off the Clock Use of Social Media Can Still Impact Your Workplace

From istockphoto.com

By Eric B. Meyer

Last month I was speaking about social media and the workplace to a fabulous audience at the 2014 SHRM Annual Conference and Expo in Orlando. (Email me if you want a copy of my slide deck).

One of my session themes was that there is no such thing as employees using social media “off the clock.” That is, even if an individual tweets or updates her Facebook status outside of the four walls of the workplace, that communication can still impact the workplace.

Dan Davis at IBM’s Social Business Insights blog recently wrote about this, and another Twitter user described it as the “24/7 social media conundrum” Two recent incidents described below bear this out. Read more…

Talent Management

Facebook’s Study Shows Why the Emotional Intent of Words Matter

Facebook Logo

All over the news this week is Facebook’s stealthy psychological experiment on users.

If you’ve missed the news, here’s the quick summary: Researchers from Facebook, Cornell University and the University of California “altered” the algorithm that determines what is seen in the news feed.

This change went into effect for nearly 700,000 users, divided into two groups. One group saw posts with words more commonly associated with positive emotions (“love, nice, sweet”) while the other group saw posts with more negative words (“hurt, ugly, nasty”).

Setting aside the moral question of submitting people to a psychological test they’re unaware of, the results are quite interesting. Read more…

HR Insights

Workplace Communications: Yes, Sometimes We Still Need to Talk

wifi3

I’ve been picking up the phone and calling my most important clients,” he said. “You can’t stop because there’s no email.

This was a quote based on the outage of MS Outlook this past week. The Washington Post headline blared MS Outlook outage brings offices back to the 1980’s.

For the people who were working in corporate, this was an era when there was no email to speak of, and for that matter, no computers. I had an office on Sixth Avenue in New York at that time and all I had was a phone on my desk. That was it. Read more…