Can You Demonstrate Your Business Value? 189 CHROs Say No

Will Busch came to DisruptHR to disrupt HR. In his first 15 seconds he declared, “The sole purpose of HR is to create business value through people.”

If that didn’t get you to sit up and take notice, this will: “HR is failing the national economy.” How do we know that? “Because over 70% of the people who go to work in the United States of America will say that they are miserable at their job.”

Despite certifications and training, engagement levels haven’t improved in years while the cost in lost productivity has reached $500 billion a year, says Busch, an associate partner with Korn Ferry. That situation hasn’t been addressed, Busch tells his Chicago Disrupt audience, because “we haven’t traditionally held HR accountable for money. It’s a dirty word in HR.”

You can guess where this going. When Korn Ferry surveyed 189 CHROs who either were fired or left voluntarily why, Busch said “It came down to one thing: “I cannot show and demonstrate business value.”

What HR needs to do, he says, is to broaden the HR to include “revenue, profitability, productivity, customer experience, etcetera.” In other words, business outcomes need to guide decisions. To do that Busch outlines 5 steps. You can cut right to the chase at the 3:20 mark, but don’t. Hearing what Busch has to say about HR’s past and present and its now current direction is worth your 3 minutes.

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