What Happens When You Let Employees Design Their Own Jobs?

At this digital advertising firm employees are encouraged to constantly re-evaluate their interests — and their jobs.

Recently named the fastest-growing company in Richmond, Workshop Digital was formed when Co-Founders Andrew Miller and Brian Forrester merged their two digital marketing firms. The 25-person company specializes in the competitive field of search engine optimization (SEO) and pay-per-click (PPC) advertising.

The challenge of recruiting knowledgeable employees means Workshop Digital has to think creatively to attract and retain talented team members. Among their unique initiatives: every employee has a 90-day check-in with their manager, in which they’re encouraged to suggest changes to their own job to make it fit their skills and interests.

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The result: engaged, happy employees and a 100% retention rate.

This article was originally posted on OpenWork, a nonprofit committed to inspiring companies to continuously improve how, when, and where work is done for the mutual benefit of employees and employers.

Kathleen Christensen is a member of the board of directors at OpenWork, a new nonprofit inspiring companies to continuously improve how, when, and where work is done for the mutual benefit of employees and employers. Kathleen directs the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Working Longer program. Previously, Dr. Christensen established and led Sloan’s 17-year pioneering program on working families, including spearheading the first national workplace flexibility campaign. Dr. Christensen planned and participated in the 2014 White House Summit on Working Families and the 2010 White House Forum on Workplace Flexibility. In 2010, Dr. Christensen was named by Working Mother magazine as one of the “Seven Wonders of the Work-Life Field.” In 2004, Families and Work Institute honored her with the inaugural Work-Life Legacy Award as a founder of the work-life field.

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